Water Lilies by Jim Harris

30

May

let's hear it for the wren

gw

While I was sitting with friends in the garden of their north London home at the weekend a wren began to sing. I could not see it but the song is so loud and so distinctive there was no doubt what it was. For me, that is. When I stopped the conversation to say: " Listen!" there was a kind of blank silence. " Do you know what that is?" I asked. Nobody did. Why is it that so many people in a nation that prides itself on loving wildlife simply do not hear birdsong. Where i live in north London blackbirds sing beautifully all summer blackbird  in the winter the robins robin can be heard all day and sometimes all night. The little wren has the most piercing call and is more often heard than seen. wren The song of the wren is so penetrating that you would think it would make people stop and listen. But somehow most people seem to be deaf to it. Is it because they do not expect to encounter wild birds in London? Would they take more notice if they heard the song in the countryside? 

It is the same with the swifts which now whizz round the rooftops in the evening screaming excitedly swifts ( see my earlier blog). All the recordings are taken from the BBC website http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/science/birdsong.shtml

No comments.
Name:
Email:
Comment:
Enter verification code: Captcha not loaded